Ernest Becker and The Denial of Death

rant & rave, shoot da'shit, drop a link, whatever....
Forum rules
"No Flaming" rule will be loosely enforced considering nature of discussion. All other forum rules still apply.

Re: Ernest Becker and The Denial of Death

Unread postby toechief » Fri May 11, 2018 4:02 am

Image
Image
Image
Image
Image

https://medium.com/@ImpossibleCoast/denial-of-death-ernest-becker-8b78f44d1a95
Seizure Warning: Not for people with photosensitive epilepsy.
User avatar
toechief
Champitus Legenda
 
Posts: 7035
Joined: Thu Jan 29, 2009 6:29 pm

Re: Ernest Becker and The Denial of Death

Unread postby toechief » Sun May 13, 2018 1:23 am



Pedego Stretch | Electric Cargo Bike | Pedego Electric Bikes
Seizure Warning: Not for people with photosensitive epilepsy.
User avatar
toechief
Champitus Legenda
 
Posts: 7035
Joined: Thu Jan 29, 2009 6:29 pm

Re: Ernest Becker and The Denial of Death

Unread postby toechief » Sun May 20, 2018 11:12 am





The answer will surprise you!
Seizure Warning: Not for people with photosensitive epilepsy.
User avatar
toechief
Champitus Legenda
 
Posts: 7035
Joined: Thu Jan 29, 2009 6:29 pm

Re: Ernest Becker and The Denial of Death

Unread postby toechief » Mon May 21, 2018 10:42 am

Image
Somethings cannot be understood unless experienced, the dream is that strong. And the pain that results from those experiences become locked in the psyche forever more. Even drano won't unclog that unresolved drama. But humans learn in this way. This is my favorite muse to ponder: Everything that comes from a human is imaginary, and yet they are driven to extreme feats of masochism to prove they are not in touch with reality.

intj
Seizure Warning: Not for people with photosensitive epilepsy.
User avatar
toechief
Champitus Legenda
 
Posts: 7035
Joined: Thu Jan 29, 2009 6:29 pm

Re: Ernest Becker and The Denial of Death

Unread postby toechief » Mon May 28, 2018 3:18 pm



► First Out of Africa - The totally isolated Tribe of the Andaman (Sky Vision Documentary)


Storyline

On a cluster of islands deep in a Bay of Bengal live a group of people who have hidden away from the modern world. For centuries they fought off anyone who tried to intrude. Marco Polo called them cannibals. Their origins are a mystery. Where they came from, how long they have been there, who they are... no one knows. But could these islanders hold the key to the mystery of our own origins? An expedition sets out to the Andaman Islands to unravel the secrets of the people whose past could solve the riddle of human evolution.

The ancient tribes of the Andaman's have always mystified explorers. They live in the heart of South-East Asia, yet are very small and very dark-skinned. They look like African pygmies. How or when they came to these islands is a puzzle. It is thought they may have been washed ashore there hundreds of years ago from a slave ship, but new evidence suggests another explanation. When biochemist, Dr. Erika Hagelberg, extracted DNA from Andaman hair samples gathered a hundred years ago she realized that the Andaman islanders could be far more important than anyone have ever imagined.

She had discovered what seemed to be a group of hunter-gatherers caught in a time warp. Believing that the Andaman islanders could even be the living ancestors of modern mankind, she set out to solve the mystery of their origin. She realized their past could be a vital link to understanding the evolution of modern man.

Biochemist Erika Hagelberg has been involved in a number of high-profile forensic identification cases, but this story begins when she came across a huge collection of hair samples gathering dust in a drawer. They have been brought back from the Andaman Islands by the pioneering anthropologist Radcliffe Brown in 1908. Over the centuries explorers have collected tons of body parts which lie forgotten in museum stores.

Until techniques for extracting DNA from bones and hair were developed they appeared completely valueless. When Radcliffe Brown visited the islands early in the 20th century he brought back an enormous amount of material. But even he never solved the mystery of how the people who resembled African pygmies had ended up in Asia.
Last edited by toechief on Sun Jun 03, 2018 10:18 am, edited 1 time in total.
Seizure Warning: Not for people with photosensitive epilepsy.
User avatar
toechief
Champitus Legenda
 
Posts: 7035
Joined: Thu Jan 29, 2009 6:29 pm

Re: Ernest Becker and The Denial of Death

Unread postby toechief » Mon May 28, 2018 6:49 pm



Storyline

A professor of psychology at the University of Toronto, Jordan Peterson set off a firestorm in 2016 when he publicly denounced Canada's Bill C-16, a law that protected gender expression and identity. Protesting the use of special pronouns designed to describe variations of gender, Peterson was catapulted onto the global stage as an immediately polarizing figure. Since that time, as his public profile has widened, he has garnered an international audience of eager disciples and inflamed detractors. Jordan Peterson: Truth in the Time of Chaos offers an in-depth conversation with the controversial professor as he expands upon his perceptions of personal responsibility, human rights, political correctness and the importance of historical archetypes.

Much of the conversation evokes the Logos, an ancient Greek philosophy that promotes the persuasive powers of logic. If humans were to live as the reincarnation of the Logos, Peterson argues, then they would achieve harmonious alignment and eradicate chaos from their reality.

Peterson discusses the need to latch onto archetypes which have been deeply embedded into our culture for centuries, including the notion of the masculine and feminine. In his view, the attempts to disrupt and dismantle these structures will ultimately result in a societal breakdown from which we may never recover. The argument goes beyond gender identification - which he views as a sideshow to the real issues at play - and speaks to the destructive impact of the post-modernist philosophy.

Peterson's teachings are an expansion of Jungian philosophies, especially in regards to the notion of a shadow self. If one were to fully embody their moral and shadow selves - their capacity for both good and unspeakable evil - then they might achieve a level of consciousness bordering on the mythic.

Jordan Peterson: Truth in the Time of Chaos is an effective distillation of the professor's views, and of the ills that many believe are plaguing our modern society. The film explores a phenomenon that has proven especially alluring to male audiences, and has amassed tens of millions of views on YouTube. Whether you believe Peterson is a savior to Western civilization or a false prophet who indulges in heresy, the film puts forth a number of well articulated subjects that are worthy of exploration.
Seizure Warning: Not for people with photosensitive epilepsy.
User avatar
toechief
Champitus Legenda
 
Posts: 7035
Joined: Thu Jan 29, 2009 6:29 pm

Re: Ernest Becker and The Denial of Death

Unread postby toechief » Fri Jun 08, 2018 3:09 am


Rethinking methods of execution.



Nitrogen hypoxia

Which brings us to the latest idea: “Nitrogen hypoxia”, which involves replacing air with an inert gas such as nitrogen or helium. It first gained traction after a BBC documentary presented by former Conservative MP Michael Portillo. In How to Kill a Human Being, he declared that the method is “a perfect killing device”.

For a start, air is 78% nitrogen anyway, so it’s easy to get hold of. The method is also a surprisingly quick demise. One study from the 1960s found that volunteers breathing pure nitrogen lost consciousness in around 17-20 seconds. Based on animal studies, it’s thought that they would have stopped breathing after three seconds.

And due to a quirk of biology it’s apparently painless. That’s because the body can’t actually detect a lack of oxygen – just an excess of carbon dioxide, which acidifies the blood and causes that aching feeling in your legs after exercise. This means it doesn’t feel like suffocation.

So what does it feel like?

John Levinson, a cardiologist and pilot based in Boston, Massachusetts, has some insights. Some years ago he was flying his prized Mooney plane at 23,000 feet (7km) , a height at which the Earth’s atmosphere is thinner and pilots must use supplemental oxygen.

Then he did something risky: he tilted up a corner of his mask and kept breathing. “After about 30 seconds I felt truly weird,” he says. “I didn’t have hallucinations, or pain, or confusion, I just felt weird. It wasn’t like alcohol or any other substance like that.”

The subtle symptoms of hypoxia make it particularly deadly to pilots at high altitude, who may not recognise that anything is wrong. It’s thought to have claimed the life of a man earlier this year, who appeared unconscious in his small plane before going missing over the Gulf of Mexico.

In Levinson’s case, he was flying with his instructor, who would have brought the plane down safely in the event that he passed out. The idea was to get a sense of what hypoxia is like, so that he could recognise when it was happening in the future. Years later, while flying with his wife, he started to get the same weird feeling. He recognised it immediately and fixed a kink in his oxygen line before anyone got hurt.

Three US States have now authorised the method as a back-up. But is this just another mistake?

Robert Dunham, a litigator and the Executive Director of the Death Penalty Information Center, certainly thinks so. “The American Veterinary Medical Association and World Animal Protection both say that nitrogen hypoxia is inappropriate for veterinary euthanasia,” he says. “It’s not quick as has been advertised – cats and dogs are aware of their impending death before they lose consciousness and it takes at least seven minutes to put to death a pig.”

One of the primary issues is that the method relies on the cooperation of the prisoner: if they hold their breath, or their breathing is too shallow, it might take much longer to kill them. “I understand, of course, the theory behind it, that suggests it would be a humane method,” says McCracken. “But that is a far cry from how it would actually be performed in an execution chamber.”

According to Dunham, in all likelihood the victim would have to be anaesthetised first. And this brings us back to the issues facing the lethal injection: no pharmaceutical company wants its drugs used to kill people.

“The key problem the United States has is that it doesn’t want the gruesome or visceral aspects of capital punishment. It wants the prisoner executed, but it doesn’t want on its conscience that it’s brutally killing somebody. That’s an internal contradiction,” he says.

“When it comes to execution, I think people need to understand that the death penalty is not a humane act.”

(the best way is a mix of argon and nitrogen, used for welding stainless steel)


http://www.bbc.com/future/story/20180604-is-there-a-humane-way-to-kill-a-criminal
Seizure Warning: Not for people with photosensitive epilepsy.
User avatar
toechief
Champitus Legenda
 
Posts: 7035
Joined: Thu Jan 29, 2009 6:29 pm

Re: Ernest Becker and The Denial of Death

Unread postby toechief » Sun Jun 17, 2018 11:06 am

Image

Are Microplastics in Food a Threat to Your Health?

Most people use plastic every day.

However, this material generally isn’t biodegradable. Over time, it breaks down into tiny pieces called microplastics, which can be harmful to the environment.

What’s more, recent studies have shown that microplastics are found commonly in food, particularly seafood.

Nevertheless, it is unclear whether these microplastics affect human health. This article will take an in-depth look at microplastics and whether they are a threat to your health.


What Are Microplastics?

Microplastics are small pieces of plastic that are found in the environment.

They are defined as plastic particles less than 0.2 inches (5 mm) in diameter.

They are either produced as small plastics, such as microbeads added to toothpaste and exfoliants, or are created when larger plastics are broken down in the environment.

Microplastics are common in oceans, rivers and soil and are often consumed by animals.

A number of studies in the 1970s began investigating the levels of microplastics in the oceans and found high levels in the Atlantic Ocean off the US coast (1, 2).

These days, due to the world’s increasing use of plastic, there is much more plastic in rivers and oceans. An estimated 8.8 million tons (8 million metric tonnes) of plastic waste enter the ocean every year (3).

A whopping 276,000 tons (250,000 metric tonnes) of this plastic is currently floating at sea, while the rest has likely sunk or washed ashore (4).

The rest of the story:
https://www.healthline.com/nutrition/microplastics#health-effects
Seizure Warning: Not for people with photosensitive epilepsy.
User avatar
toechief
Champitus Legenda
 
Posts: 7035
Joined: Thu Jan 29, 2009 6:29 pm

Re: Ernest Becker and The Denial of Death

Unread postby toechief » Thu Jun 21, 2018 9:28 pm

Image
Seizure Warning: Not for people with photosensitive epilepsy.
User avatar
toechief
Champitus Legenda
 
Posts: 7035
Joined: Thu Jan 29, 2009 6:29 pm

Previous

Return to da'Lounge

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 4 guests



All material submitted is sole responsibility of the original uploader.

Contact BeerFarts Public Relations Department at:
beerfarts2@protonmail.com

2009 - 2018 © All Rights Reserved- BeerFarts, LLC