Movie types explained

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Movie types explained

Unread postby Passing by » Thu Jun 04, 2009 12:31 pm

Almost everything U never wanted to know!!

CAM
A cam is a theater rip usually done with a digital video camera. A mini tripod is sometimes used, but a lot of the time this wont be possible, so the camera might shake. Also seating placement isn't always idle, and it might be filmed from an angle. If cropped properly, this is hard to tell unless there's text on the screen, but a lot of times these are left with triangular borders on the top and bottom of the screen. Sound is taken from the onboard microphone of the camera, and especially in comedies, laughter can often be heard during the film. Due to these factors picture and sound quality are usually quite poor, but sometimes we're lucky, and the theater will be fairly empty and a fairly clear signal will be heard.

TELESYNC (TS)
A telesync is the same spec as a CAM except it uses an external audio source (most likely an audio jack in the chair for hard of hearing people). A direct audio source does not ensure a good quality audio source, as a lot of background noise can interfere. A lot of the times a telesync is filmed in an empty cinema or from the projection booth with a professional camera, giving a better picture quality. Quality ranges drastically, check the sample before downloading the full release. A high percentage of Telesyncs are CAMs that have been mislabeled.

TELECINE (TC)
A telecine machine copies the film digitally from the reels. Sound and picture should be very good, but due to the equipment involved and cost telecines are fairly uncommon. Generally the film will be in correct aspect ratio, although 4:3 telecines have existed. A great example is the JURASSIC PARK 3 TC done last year. TC should not be confused with TimeCode , which is a visible counter on screen throughout the film.

SCREENER (SCR)
A pre VHS tape, sent to rental stores, and various other places for promotional use. A screener is supplied on a VHS tape, and is usually in a 4:3 (full screen) a/r, although letterboxed screeners are sometimes found. The main draw back is a "ticker" (a message that scrolls past at the bottom of the screen, with the copyright and anti-copy telephone number). Also, if the tape contains any serial numbers, or any other markings that could lead to the source of the tape, these will have to be blocked, usually with a black mark over the section. This is sometimes only for a few seconds, but unfortunately on some copies this will last for the entire film, and some can be quite big. Depending on the equipment used, screener quality can range from excellent if done from a MASTER copy, to very poor if done on an old VHS recorder thru poor capture equipment on a copied tape. Most screeners are transferred to VCD, but a few attempts at SVCD have occurred, some looking better than others.

DVD-SCREENER (DVDscr)
Same premise as a screener, but transferred off a DVD. Usually letterbox , but without the extras that a DVD retail would contain. The ticker is not usually in the black bars, and will disrupt the viewing. If the ripper has any skill, a DVDscr should be very good. Usually transferred to SVCD or DivX/XviD.

R5
This is fairly new movie format. Basically the same as DVD Screener - this kind of release is legal DVD released in Russia to decrease the level of pirated movies in this country. Retail is rushed out by the studio, so there is little to no cleanup of the film after the telecine process. As a result, U can see some scratches, hairs or other mess on the picture, but U will hardly notice it while watching. External English audio is often used, as these are supplied with Russian sound by default.

DVDRip
A copy of the final released DVD. If possible this is released PRE retail (for example, Star Wars episode 2) again, should be excellent quality. DVDrips are released in SVCD and DivX/XviD.

VHSRip
Transferred off a retail VHS, mainly skating/sports videos and XXX releases.

TVRip
TV episode that is either from Network (capped using digital cable/satellite boxes are preferable) or PRE-AIR from satellite feeds sending the program around to networks a few days earlier (do not contain "dogs" but sometimes have flickers etc) Some programs such as WWF Raw Is War contain extra parts, and the "dark matches" and camera/commentary tests are included on the rips. PDTV is capped from a digital TV PCI card, generally giving the best results, and groups tend to release in SVCD for these. VCD/SVCD/DivX/XviD rips are all supported by the TV scene.

PPVRip
PPVRips are Pay-Per-View videos which have been recorded. Recently we have seen a few of these PPVRip’s come out. The source of a PPVRip is a Television Screen which is basically recorded to a PVR or DVD Recorder. A PPVRip looks exactly the same as a VHS-Screener as they both have the VHS/TV Full Screen resolution and the same principles apply when recording from a full screen source. The actual source of a PPVRip is often an Hotel room TV which uses the room’s movies as the source.

WORKPRINT (WP)
A workprint is a copy of the film that has not been finished. It can be missing scenes, music, and quality can range from excellent to very poor. Some WPs are very different from the final print (Men In Black is missing all the aliens, and has actors in their places) and others can contain extra scenes (Jay and Silent Bob) . WPs can be nice additions to the collection once a good quality final has been obtained.

DivX Re-Enc
A DivX re-enc is a film that has been taken from its original VCD source, and re-encoded into a small DivX file. Most commonly found on file sharers, these are usually labeled something like Film.Name.Group(1of2) etc. Common groups are SMR and TND. These aren't really worth downloading, unless you're that unsure about a film u only want a 200mb copy of it. Generally avoid.

Watermarks
A lot of films come from Asian Silvers/PDVD (see below) and these are tagged by the people responsible. Usually with a letter/initials or a little logo, generally in one of the corners. Most famous are the "Z" "A" and "Globe" watermarks.

Asian Silvers / PDVD
These are films put out by eastern bootleggers, and these are usually bought by some groups to put out as their own. Silvers are very cheap and easily available in a lot of countries, and its easy to put out a release, which is why there are so many in the scene at the moment, mainly from smaller groups who don't last more than a few releases. PDVDs are the same thing pressed onto a DVD. They have removable subtitles, and the quality is usually better than the silvers. These are ripped like a normal DVD, but usually released as VCD.

BDRIP
BDRip is basically just the same thing as a DVDRip, but it uses the Blu Ray as source. BDRip also uses the Xvid codec.The quality is a bit better and you can watch the movie most of the time earlier.
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Re: Movie types explained

Unread postby Tender » Mon Jul 06, 2009 8:17 am

thank you!!!!
i cut n pasted this to my documents so i will always have it!!!!!!
id never remember all those abbreviations!!!
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Re: Movie types explained MP4 Player movies

Unread postby P/C » Mon Nov 16, 2009 10:01 am

MP4 Player movies

As an avid movie fan, you know how cool it would be to watch your favorite movies wherever you go. Today, most portable multimedia devices are now able to play full length movies thanks to the latest in data storage technology. With portable multimedia devices reaching hundreds of gigabytes of memory space, you will be able to store several full length movies on your MP4 Player.

With portable multimedia devices, such as the iPod, Zune player, and PSP, you will be able to watch your favorite movies even while you are on the go. This means that if you are in a bus from LA to Las Vegas, you will be able to keep yourself entertained as you wait for the bus to reach its destination.

However, before you start moving the movies stored on your computer to your portable multimedia devices, you need to know that most portable multimedia devices today don't support just any kind of video format. Usually, popular portable multimedia devices today, such as the iPod, Zune player, and PSP, only support MP4 videos. What this means is that the AVI, and MPEG-1 and 2 format movies stored on your computer will not be playable on your portable multimedia device.
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High Definition (HD) Detailed Explanation

Unread postby P/C » Fri Dec 25, 2009 7:45 pm

1. What is HD?
Before we talk about HD, I will explain what is SD(standard definition). Camcorder prduces SD videos has a resolution of 640*480. It means that 640 lines of vertical resolution and 480 lines of horizontal resolution. Nowadays, 16:9 widescreen became common so SD maybe 720*480.
Now we can easily come to a conclusion that HD must have a higher resolution that SD. Right! HD video has a higher resolution than SD video, and now the HD camcorder can record two competing formats, 720p and 1080i.
The first, 720p, refers to camcorders producing a resolution of 1280 x 720.
The second, 1080i, refers to camcorders producing a resolution of 1920 x 1080.
You will ask what is the difference between “p” and “i”. The "p" in 720p stands for progressive. This means that the entire image is refreshed at the same time, 30 times per second. Qualitatively, this tends to produce smoother motion, and is often preferred for sports shooting; because freeze frames will not have the same jagginess that 1080i produces. The trade-off is that 720p has less resolution.
The "i" stands for interlaced. Traditionally, camcorders split up those horizontal rows of resolution into odds and evens. First one set is refreshed, and then the other set. Each of these "fields" is refreshed, back and forth, each at 30 times per second. It happens fast enough that the human eye usually can't see the slight lag time. However, when you pause an interlaced video clip, you'll see a distinct jagginess.
Tips:
1080p means 11920*1080 progressive and not many camcorder can produce this kind of hd format but many TV now and playback it.

2. What is the difference between media and format?
“Media” and “Format” are two terms that will make people confused. First, “Media” refers to where the camcorders store the video. And “Format” refers to the compression of the camcorder use.
These two terms make people categories HD camcorder into different types.
Media Types:
Common media type includes “type”, “hard disc drive (HDD)”, “DVD” and “flash memory”. Camcorders that use a type of tape called “miniDV” and it uses the same tape with the SD camcorder, so it is more easily to edit. Popular Model: Canon HV20, Canon HV30, Sony HDR-HC9.
HDD media is high capacity, usually 60 - 120 gigabytes. Long record times are great, but you must have the discipline to routinely back up video to a separate hard drive or DVD. Popular models: JVC GZ-HD7 and GZ-HD6, Canon HG10, Sony HDR-SR12, Panasonic HDC-HS9.
DVD media in camcorder is always refers to the mini DVD (8mm). It is really familiar with us but the time of the video you record is limited to 15 mins when you shotting with the highest quality and you can only play the DVD in blu ray player not in your DVD player. Popular models: Sony HDR-UX10 and HDR-UX20, Canon HR10
Flash Memory: Many consider this the media type of the future. Battery efficient, extremely compact, and easy. Capacities may be limited compared to HDD, though it gets larger every year. Some camcorders have removable memory cards, some have non-removable internal memory, and some have both. Popular models: Canon HF10, Canon HF100, Panasonic HDC-SD9, Sony HDR-CX7, Samsung SC-HMX20, Sanyo VPC-HD1000

Format Types:
There are four common format types camcorder and they are “HDV”, “AVCHD”, “MPEG-2 Transport Stream” and “AVC/H.264 MPEG-4”.
HDV is the oldest HD camcorder and it can record only 1440*1080 video and then stretch to 1920*1080 for playback. But its miniDV tape is widely accepts by editing software.
AVCHD is introduced in 2006 by Sony and Panasonic. Every manufacturer has a slightly different recipe for AVCHD, so finding a compatible editing program can be tough. Also, you'll need a powerhouse computer to work with files. All current AVCHD camcorders record in 1080i, though the format allows for 720p. The file extension may be .mts, .m2ts, and .ts so when you edit the video I think you need to use mts converter, m2ts converter and ts converter to help. If you are Mac users, here are mts converter for mac , m2ts converter for mac and ts converter for Mac . MPEG-2 Transport Stream - JVC is the only manufacturer using this format, found on its line of high definition Everio camcorders. On average, the lowest overall picture quality, now that AVCHD has matured. Low compatibility with editing software.
AVC/H.264 MPEG-4 -This format is currently used by some Samsung and Sanyo camcorders, all of which record in 720p.

3. How to Convert MTS, M2TS, TS Videos for Different Usage?
The HD files that your camcorder recorded can be transferred to your computer to play, but it can the video format is not supported by iPod/iPhone/windows movie maker/Zune/Creative Zen and other video editing and playing devices.
So you need to convert them in order to share and enjoy them anywhere and anytime.
you need a MTS Converter .
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Watching Videos In Different Formats

Unread postby GBDU » Wed Jun 22, 2011 6:29 am

In reply to a question asked:
If you have more than one computer--for instance, a desktop and a laptop--you may have encountered video files that run on one machine but not the other.
That's probably because of a codec conflict. Videos are encoded in assorted formats, and if, say, your laptop doesn't have the proper decoder for a particular format, you can't watch the video. Suppose you downloaded an episode of a TV show using BitTorrent.If that video was encoded with, say, DivX or MKV, your PC won't play it without the right codec (short for "coder-decoder"). Install K-Lite Codec Pack Full, which has everything you need to play AVI, FLV, MKV, and other formats.
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How to use .sub and .idx files

Unread postby analyzed » Sun Jan 08, 2012 10:05 am

:mrgreen: How to use .sub and .idx files for movies

For some foreign movies that are not dubbed or hard subbed in English, you may need to download subtitles with extensions

.sub and .idx

First, just make sure the movie (.avi) and the sub files (.idx and .sub) are in one folder with exactly the same file name

except for its corresponding extensions, of course.

Example:

the.myth.2005.dvdrip.xvid.espise.avi
the.myth.2005.dvdrip.xvid.espise.idx
the.myth.2005.dvdrip.xvid.espise.sub

Simplest way:

Use VLC Player to play the movie. VLC media player is an open source, free software media player and multimedia framework written by the VideoLAN project. It can read more codecs than other media players.
VLC Player can automatically load the subtitle for you
(as long as you put the files in one folder with the same file name. )



When you play the video and if the default subtitle is not in English, you can select the language by clicking VIDEO
(a dropdown menu will show),
then choose SUBTITLES TRACK
(another dropdown menu will show),
then choose the language of your choice.

What about .srt?
Well, it’s the same. Just put everything in one folder and use VLC Player. There’s no need for you to convert .idx, .sub to whatever sub files, if you will just use VLC.


:mrgreen: What are R5, R3, DVD Screener, Telecine, Telesync

Telecine (TC)

A telecine machine copies the film digitally from the reels. Sound and picture should be very good, but due to the equipment involved and cost telecines are fairly uncommon. Generally the film will be in correct aspect ratio, although 4:3 telecines have existed.

R5 or R3 (TC)

5 releases differ from normal releases in that they are a direct Telecine transfer of the film without any of the image processing. They take the information from the DVD disc and sync it to an English version of the film, usually a Russian R5 released version. Which means that the sound often isn’t as good as DVDRips. In some cases, R5 DVDs may be released without an English audio track, requiring pirates to use the direct line audio from the film’s theatrical release. Quality is DVDSCR or better.

DVD Screener ( DVDScr)(TC)

Same premise as a screener, but transferred off a DVD. Usually letterbox , but without the extras that a DVD retail would contain. The ticker is not usually in the black bars, and will disrupt the viewing. If the ripper has any skill, a DVDscr should be very good. Usually transferred to SVCD or DivX/XviD.

Telesync (TS)

A telesync is the same spec as a CAM except it uses an external audio source (most likely an audio jack in the chair for hard of hearing people). A direct audio source does not ensure a good quality audio source, as a lot of background noise can interfere. A lot of the times a telesync is filmed in an empty cinema or from the projection booth with a professional camera, giving a better picture quality. Quality ranges drastically, check the sample before downloading the full release. A high percentage of Telesyncs are CAMs that have been mislabeled.


:mrgreen: How To View The Movie While You are Still Downloading It


Sometimes you could only find download links (no streaming) for some movies and TV Shows and that makes you wonder how is the quality and all before you download. Or perhaps you are in doubt if this is the right movie you’re looking for (could be just a similar title).

Anyway, there is a method on how you can view the file while ur still downloading it.

No, you can’t use that crappy Windows Media Player!



Use VLC Player


1. Download the file. Take note of the folder where you save it.

2. While downloading, check the file in your folder. You should see 2 files for the same movie you are downloading – one is a .avi (which at this point will show 0 kb) and the other one is a .part (where you can see the file size that had already transferred to your PC)

3. Wait until you have downloaded at least 10Mb.

4. Right click on the .part file and choose PLAY WITH then choose VLC Player.
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About MKV files

Unread postby GBDU » Tue Jan 10, 2012 5:18 am

Someone asked about mkv files and how to play those:
here's how etc:

Code: Select all
http://www.afterdawn.com/guides/archive/how_to_play_mkv.cfm
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Re: Movie types explained

Unread postby boomersooner » Tue Jul 03, 2012 11:00 am

Good info, PB. Last winter, a copy of the US version of Girl with the Dragon Tatoo came out just as the movie was in the theaters. No way was it a cam. It had to be a DVD rip. Super quality. Think it was xvid, avi. and It was 2.4 gig. Converted to wmv since when I burned it to a DVD and deleted the orig file. Where could that have come from? Was there a pre- release DVD someone got hold of? Or was it a rip from theater digitsal? Maybe the source would be in the list posted, but I'm missing it.

For playing different types of video, for those new to video, just thought I'd mention VLC Player - 90% here know of it , i'm sure. Plays almost anything. I have it and klite mega codec pack for WMP.

And of course, very useful info for video buffs:

http://forum.videohelp.com/
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Re: Movie types explained

Unread postby zaphod42b » Tue Oct 07, 2014 3:05 am

OK, so I am new to the Cine part, and I want to download movies. First: How do I view movies that download in multiple files?? What is the best free program for doing that? Any advice on how??
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Re: Movie types explained

Unread postby styron » Tue Oct 07, 2014 5:23 am

For convenience you need to download all parts to the same folder. Same sized link parts from different filehosts are usually interchangeable - so you can download part x from one filehost and part y from another - minimising your wait time restriction between downloads as a 'free' (ie. no account) user of the different filehosts.

Once you have all parts they need to be decompressed or extracted from part 1 and will join up to give you the movie. You can use WinZip or WinRar if you have them or a good freeware program is http://www.7-zip.org/. They all work roughly similar - right click part 1 and select extract here or to the name of the file in quotes which will extract it to a folder of its own.

The best easy to use multi-format player is still probably VLC http://www.videolan.org/vlc/index.html
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